Von Neumann's Machine

Magical & thermodynamical, non-classical & stochastical!

paleoillustration:

(3D printing) Darwin’s Cladogram Tree with Finches, by Joaquin Baldwin:

"Charles Darwin’s first ever sketch of a tree of life, in the shape of an actual tree, with finches perched on the branches. Each branch and minute detail of Darwin’s original drawing is represented, and each finch represents the A, B, C and D marks on his sketch. The sketch appeared in his private notebook (“Notebook B on the transmutation of species,” 1837–1838).

If you look carefully, you’ll notice that each finch is slightly different, and the more apart they are from each other in the evolutionary tree, the more distinct the differences are.”

(via freshphotons)

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands
 Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.
The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.
“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …
 The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.
“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”
The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands


Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.

The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.

“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …


The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.

“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”

The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

(via cwilliamblr)

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands
 Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.
The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.
“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …
 The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.
“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”
The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands


Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.

The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.

“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …


The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.

“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”

The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

(via cwilliamblr)

redhousecanada:

ronbeckdesigns:
a collection of old manhole covers from the scrapyards of Los Angeles, used to cover a driveway (photo by Ildiko Lazslo)

redhousecanada:

ronbeckdesigns:

a collection of old manhole covers from the scrapyards of Los Angeles, used to cover a driveway (photo by Ildiko Lazslo)

scienceisbeauty:

Detected primordial gravitational waves! See how looks the excitement of a big discovery in scientists, or more precisely, the emotion after experimental evidences about a theory, inflation theory, over one of the fathers of it. Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo surprises Professor Andrei Linde with evidence that supports cosmic inflation theory.

Some links:

rhamphotheca:

Behold the first geological map of Ganymede, Jupiter’s largest moon

by Lauren Davis

Four hundred years ago, Galileo Galilei observed Ganymede in orbit around Jupiter. This week, a team of planetary scientists unveiled the first global geological map of our solar system’s largest moon.

Using images obtained by NASA’s Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft and the Galileo orbiter, a team led by Geoffrey Collins of Wheaton College pieced together a mosaic image of the planet, giving us our first complete image of the geological features of the satellite. Above, you can see the moon centered at 200 west longitude. The darker areas represent the very old and heavily cratered region of Ganymede, while the lighter areas are somewhat younger regions marked with grooves and ridges…

(read more: io9)   (… and a 2nd look.)

images: NASA-JPL

(via scientificillustration)

joshbyard:

Programmable Materials “Could Change the World of Mechanics Forever”

Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich have developed a prototype of a selective vibration-damping material that they claim “could change the world of mechanics forever” as a step toward “programmable materials.”
Described in the journal Advanced Materials, this “material of the future” can damp mechanical vibrations completely or selectively suppress specific vibration frequencies or ranges of frequencies.
The one-dimensional working model consists of a simple aluminum sheet-metal strip, measuring one meter by one centimeter and one millimeter thick and designed to vibrate at different frequencies. To control the wave propagation through the plate, ten small aluminum cylinders (7 mm thick, 1 cm high) are attached to the metal. Between the sheet and the cylinders sit piezoelectric discs, which can be stimulated electronically to instantly change their thickness. That allows for controlling exactly how waves are allowed to propagate in the sheet-metal strip.
The aluminum strip thus turns into an “adaptive phononic crystal” — a material with controllable vibration properties.

(via A step towards ‘programmable materials’ | KurzweilAI)

joshbyard:

Programmable Materials “Could Change the World of Mechanics Forever”

Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich have developed a prototype of a selective vibration-damping material that they claim “could change the world of mechanics forever” as a step toward “programmable materials.”

Described in the journal Advanced Materials, this “material of the future” can damp mechanical vibrations completely or selectively suppress specific vibration frequencies or ranges of frequencies.

The one-dimensional working model consists of a simple aluminum sheet-metal strip, measuring one meter by one centimeter and one millimeter thick and designed to vibrate at different frequencies. To control the wave propagation through the plate, ten small aluminum cylinders (7 mm thick, 1 cm high) are attached to the metal. Between the sheet and the cylinders sit piezoelectric discs, which can be stimulated electronically to instantly change their thickness. That allows for controlling exactly how waves are allowed to propagate in the sheet-metal strip.

The aluminum strip thus turns into an “adaptive phononic crystal” — a material with controllable vibration properties.

(via A step towards ‘programmable materials’ | KurzweilAI)

(via emergentfutures)

Have physicists finally detected gravitational waves? Breaking News - Updates to Come

thescienceofreality:

By Mika McKinnon, images via io9 Space,

The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has news so big it announced that it would announce something. The press conference will stream live tomorrow at noon, but cosmologists everywhere are gossiping about what that news could be. The leading theory: Scientists have detected gravitational waves, in what would be a landmark discovery for the field of physics.

Gravitational waves are the last chunk of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity that was predicted but not yet observed. If gravitational waves have been observed, it most likely was done by the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (Bicep) telescope at the south pole. It stared at the cosmic microwave background radiation from 2003 to 2008, but it takes a long time to process and analyze the data when looking for a faint signal in a lot of noise.

2007 photograph of telescopes at the Dark Center at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. From top to bottom, the partly-buried AST/ROQUaDViper, and finally BICEP and SPT at the bottom. Image credit: Robert Schwarz

The Bicep mission page describes anticipated gravitational waves as faint, polarized, and distorted by gravitational lensing of objects between us and the cosmic microwave background radiation. They released a video of their observations in 2008. The colour scale adjusts throughout the movie to highlight temperature fluctuations of both the cosmic microwave background radiation, and the galactic plane:

 

Why look at the cosmic microwave background radiation for signs of gravitational waves? Because an infinitesimal moment after the universe started — 10-34 seconds after the big bang — we think it went through an inflationary period. If it did, that inflation could have amplified gravitational waves to such an extent that we can actually detect them. This would not only fill in that last missing chunk of things predicted by General Relativity that we haven’t seen yet, but also offer a glimpse into the primeval universe. They won’t be insta-proof that inflationary theory is correct, but they would rule out some cyclic theories for the origin of the universe.

Some pre-announcement articles are already mixing up very common gravity waves with gravitational waves. To differentiate, I’ll pass things off to an exasperated Dr. Katherine Mack:

 

Gravity waves are common phenomena in both the ocean and the sky, as seen in this MODIS image. Read more about them at the Earth Observatory.

As for the press conference, I’m already bracing for disappointment. “Breaking news! We’ll have breaking news for you on Monday!” announcements produce so much hype that the actual discovery probably won’t live up to expectations. I’m not the only one feeling that way — the Guardian ran an entire piece interviewing cautiously excited cosmologists warning that the observations would need to be highly robust if they’re going to be momentous.

(via scinerds)

skeptv:

NEW - 10 Amazing Bets That You Never Lose (Episode 10)

I have just made a new ’10 bets you will never lose’ video. Hope you like it. What’s your favourite bet?

Follow @richardwiseman

via Quirkology.