Von Neumann's Machine

Magical & thermodynamical, non-classical & stochastical!
engineeringhistory:

IBM RAMAC with 350 disk storage unit. The RAMAC was introduced in 1956 and was the first commercial computer that used a moving head hard disk drive. The 350 disk storage unit was capable of storing 3.75 MB.

engineeringhistory:

IBM RAMAC with 350 disk storage unit. The RAMAC was introduced in 1956 and was the first commercial computer that used a moving head hard disk drive. The 350 disk storage unit was capable of storing 3.75 MB.

brain-smudge:

Irving Geis
Geis’s early sketch and resulting finished illustration of a hemoglobin molecule. 
(Courtesy of the Irving Geis Collection, Howard Hughes Medical Institute)

(via scientificillustration)

spaceplasma:

Comet plunge reveals solar secrets

In December 2011, space telescopes witnessed an event that astonished astronomers. A comet plunged deep through the atmosphere of the Sun and survived.

Comets are reckoned to be pretty insubstantial things, despite their sometimes lengthy, spectacular tails. So this ball of rock and ice, called Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3), had been expected to break up and become vaporised in the encounter.

In fact the comet came out relatively unscathed, grew a fresh magnificent tail and became an impressive sight for astronauts on the International Space Station as well as on Earth.

Lovejoy’s close encounter has been extremely useful for solar scientists because it has allowed them to study a region deep within the Sun’s atmosphere, or corona, that is otherwise near impossible to observe.

Now views in the extreme-ultraviolet region of the spectrum from three solar space probes have provided new information on the characteristics of the magnetic fields embedded in the region through which Comet Lovejoy passed.

Full Article

(via profesormoriarty)

momofuku:

vanityfair:

In the Details | David Chang 
A panoply of eccentric biographical data RE: chefdom’s fretful ramen master.
HE IS the Virginia-raised son of Korean immigrants—educated in Vienna, a suburb of Washington, D.C., but well acquainted with Richmond, where his father had a business. Culinarily, this background has come to bear on such Chang creations as his Honeycrisp-apple kimchi with jowl bacon and Noodle Bar’s fried chicken served two ways, southern-style and Korean-style.
HIS FAVORITE extra-vocational activity is fly-fishing, which satisfies him, paradoxically, “because it’s constant dissatisfaction.”
HE HAS spent much of his life deliberately evading anything that smacks of normalcy. Of late, however, he finds himself thinking, “Man, normal might be really nice right now.”
Read more here. 
Photograph by Gasper Tringale. 

dave chang explains the details in vanity far this month. 

momofuku:

vanityfair:

In the Details | David Chang 

A panoply of eccentric biographical data RE: chefdom’s fretful ramen master.

HE IS the Virginia-raised son of Korean immigrants—educated in Vienna, a suburb of Washington, D.C., but well acquainted with Richmond, where his father had a business. Culinarily, this background has come to bear on such Chang creations as his Honeycrisp-apple kimchi with jowl bacon and Noodle Bar’s fried chicken served two ways, southern-style and Korean-style.

HIS FAVORITE extra-vocational activity is fly-fishing, which satisfies him, paradoxically, “because it’s constant dissatisfaction.”

HE HAS spent much of his life deliberately evading anything that smacks of normalcy. Of late, however, he finds himself thinking, “Man, normal might be really nice right now.”

Read more here. 

Photograph by Gasper Tringale. 

dave chang explains the details in vanity far this month. 

proofmathisbeautiful:

Via PolicyMic

Movies like Goodwill Hunting and A Beautiful Mind have helped us all to appreciate the beauty of mathematics in a similar way to art. New research by University College London shows that this might not just be due to good cinematography, but because our brains actually do respond to beautiful equations in the same way that they respond to great paintings or masterful music.

The study involved giving 15 mathematicians 60 different formula to assess, while measuring their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The result? This was rated the most beautiful equation:

Euler’s identity

And this, the most ugly:

Ramanujan’s infinite series

Interestingly, when you look at them it isn’t hard for those of us who are not mathematicians to see why. The former explains complex elements within a simple framework. The latter is long and messy.

The fMRI results show that the medial orbito-frontal cortex region of the brain increases in activity in response to pleasing equations. This is the very same area of the brain that fires when people see or hear an appealing work of art such as a Mozart, Shakespeare or Van Gogh. So it seems that the brain appreciates all beauty in the same way, no matter what form it comes in.

The beauty of math: If you’re still not convinced that equations can be as beautiful as other forms of art, you might want to check out this stunning video that Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux have put together. The film presents everyday events as described by math, and shows an equation on the left, a diagram in the middle, and real-life version on the right.

Although some artistic liberties are taken and not everything here represents perfect science, the piece brilliantly achieves its goal of showing people that “mathematics aren’t that abstract useless concept that we often find it to be when we study it at school,” Pineill told Fast Co.Design. “It’s an awesome universal language that is the foundation of every science and thus the tool to understand fully every single thing around us.”

popchartlab:

Presenting a perfect pairing of prints: The Wineries of Sonoma and Wineries of Napa maps, each plotting over 500 and 700 spots, respectively. Available individually or as a set in a custom-made double-display frame, these full-bodied cartographic masterpieces are 20% off for the next 24 hours only.

(via ilovecharts)