Von Neumann's Machine

Magical & thermodynamical, non-classical & stochastical!

skeptv:

SDO: Year 4

The sun is always changing and NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory is always watching. Launched on Feb. 11, 2010, SDO keeps a 24-hour eye on the entire disk of the sun, with a prime view of the graceful dance of solar material coursing through the sun’s atmosphere, the corona. SDO’s fourth year in orbit was no exception: NASA is releasing a movie of some of SDO’s best sightings of the year, including massive solar explosions and giant sunspot shows.

SDO captures images of the sun in 10 different wavelengths, each of which helps highlight a different temperature of solar material. Different temperatures can, in turn, show specific structures on the sun such as solar flares, which are giant explosions of light and x-rays, or coronal loops, which are streams of solar material traveling up and down looping magnetic field lines. The movie shows examples of both, as well as what’s called prominence eruptions, when masses of solar material leap off the sun. The movie also shows a sunspot group on the solar surface. This sunspot, a magnetically strong and complex region appearing in mid-January 2014, was one of the largest in nine years. Scientists study these images to better understand the complex electromagnetic system causing the constant movement on the sun, which can ultimately have an effect closer to Earth, too: Flares and another type of solar explosion called coronal mass ejections can sometimes disrupt technology in space. Moreover, studying our closest star is one way of learning about other stars in the galaxy. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. built, operates, and manages the SDO spacecraft for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington, D.C.

This video is public domain and can be downloaded at:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a011400/a011460/index.html

via NASA explorer.

bremser:

Hiroh Kikai, A performer of butoh dance

bremser:

Hiroh Kikai, A performer of butoh dance

betterknowamicrobe:

kirahall:

My prof showed us this picture of a prokaryotic cell and I just really enjoy staring at it. I don’t know why.

I love these pictures too.  (There are a bunch of them, not just microbes, by David Goodsell.)  I think one reason I like them so much is because they they show that the cytoplasm isn’t just empty space.  It’s really crowded in there!

betterknowamicrobe:

kirahall:

My prof showed us this picture of a prokaryotic cell and I just really enjoy staring at it. I don’t know why.

I love these pictures too.  (There are a bunch of them, not just microbes, by David Goodsell.)  I think one reason I like them so much is because they they show that the cytoplasm isn’t just empty space.  It’s really crowded in there!

(via scientificillustration)

fuzzyimages:

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED

I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!

Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!

Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  

And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway

An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.

Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.

Beautifully broken. 

(via profesormoriarty)