Von Neumann's Machine

Magical & thermodynamical, non-classical & stochastical!

proofmathisbeautiful:

Via PolicyMic

Movies like Goodwill Hunting and A Beautiful Mind have helped us all to appreciate the beauty of mathematics in a similar way to art. New research by University College London shows that this might not just be due to good cinematography, but because our brains actually do respond to beautiful equations in the same way that they respond to great paintings or masterful music.

The study involved giving 15 mathematicians 60 different formula to assess, while measuring their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The result? This was rated the most beautiful equation:

Euler’s identity

And this, the most ugly:

Ramanujan’s infinite series

Interestingly, when you look at them it isn’t hard for those of us who are not mathematicians to see why. The former explains complex elements within a simple framework. The latter is long and messy.

The fMRI results show that the medial orbito-frontal cortex region of the brain increases in activity in response to pleasing equations. This is the very same area of the brain that fires when people see or hear an appealing work of art such as a Mozart, Shakespeare or Van Gogh. So it seems that the brain appreciates all beauty in the same way, no matter what form it comes in.

The beauty of math: If you’re still not convinced that equations can be as beautiful as other forms of art, you might want to check out this stunning video that Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux have put together. The film presents everyday events as described by math, and shows an equation on the left, a diagram in the middle, and real-life version on the right.

Although some artistic liberties are taken and not everything here represents perfect science, the piece brilliantly achieves its goal of showing people that “mathematics aren’t that abstract useless concept that we often find it to be when we study it at school,” Pineill told Fast Co.Design. “It’s an awesome universal language that is the foundation of every science and thus the tool to understand fully every single thing around us.”

popchartlab:

Presenting a perfect pairing of prints: The Wineries of Sonoma and Wineries of Napa maps, each plotting over 500 and 700 spots, respectively. Available individually or as a set in a custom-made double-display frame, these full-bodied cartographic masterpieces are 20% off for the next 24 hours only.

(via ilovecharts)

paleoillustration:

(3D printing) Darwin’s Cladogram Tree with Finches, by Joaquin Baldwin:

"Charles Darwin’s first ever sketch of a tree of life, in the shape of an actual tree, with finches perched on the branches. Each branch and minute detail of Darwin’s original drawing is represented, and each finch represents the A, B, C and D marks on his sketch. The sketch appeared in his private notebook (“Notebook B on the transmutation of species,” 1837–1838).

If you look carefully, you’ll notice that each finch is slightly different, and the more apart they are from each other in the evolutionary tree, the more distinct the differences are.”

(via freshphotons)

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands
 Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.
The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.
“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …
 The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.
“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”
The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands


Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.

The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.

“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …


The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.

“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”

The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

(via cwilliamblr)

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands
 Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.
The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.
“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …
 The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.
“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”
The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

techfutures:

Stanford University develops $90 iPhone accessory to replace ophthalmology kit costing tens of thousands


Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have developed two low-cost iPhone adapters that provide images of the eye that usually require specialist ophthalmology equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars. The university hopes that it will be useful both for primary care physicians in the U.S. as well as rural medical centres in developing countries.

The adapters make it easy for anyone with minimal training to take a picture of the eye and share it securely with other health practitioners or store it in the patient’s electronic record.

“Think Instagram for the eye,” said one of the developers, assistant professor of ophthalmology Robert Chang, MD …


The device shines a light through the lens of the eyeball which is reflected back, where a magnifying lens focuses an image on the camera, allowing it to capture detailed photos of both the front and back of the eye. Images can be almost instantly added to medical records for later review by a specialist, or can be transmitted from a primary care worker in a remote area to a specialist who can provide advice on the medical attention required for an eye injury.

“Adapting smartphones for the eye has the potential to enhance the delivery of eye care — in particular, to provide it in places where it’s less accessible,” said ophthalmology resident David Myung, MD, PhD. “Whether it’s in the emergency department, where patients often have to wait a long time for a specialist, or during a primary-care physician visit, we hope that we can improve the quality of care for our patients, especially in the developing world where ophthalmologists are few and far between.”

The prototypes were made from components commonly available online, and it’s hoped that 3D printing will reduce the cost even further.

(via cwilliamblr)

redhousecanada:

ronbeckdesigns:
a collection of old manhole covers from the scrapyards of Los Angeles, used to cover a driveway (photo by Ildiko Lazslo)

redhousecanada:

ronbeckdesigns:

a collection of old manhole covers from the scrapyards of Los Angeles, used to cover a driveway (photo by Ildiko Lazslo)

scienceisbeauty:

Detected primordial gravitational waves! See how looks the excitement of a big discovery in scientists, or more precisely, the emotion after experimental evidences about a theory, inflation theory, over one of the fathers of it. Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo surprises Professor Andrei Linde with evidence that supports cosmic inflation theory.

Some links: